Sunday, April 20, 2014

Alleluia! He is Risen!


Happy Easter to all of my readers. 

I just returned from the Easter Vigil at Assumption Grotto and have many photos to post yet from Good Friday and from this evening.  I hope to have them up soon, so check back. 

See Holy Thursday photos here.

See the Easter Season schedule here.


For interesting news items I don't have time to blog on, check out my Twitter Feed: @TeDeumBlog

Te Deum Laudamus! Home

The obedient are not held captive by Holy Mother Church;
it is the disobedient who are held captive by the world!

- Diane M. Korzeniewski

Note: The recommended links below are automatically generated by the tool, so they are not necessarily related content.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Detroit Free Press reporter drives wedge between area Catholics over foot-washing ceremony



This public debate over Holy Thursday foot-washing is getting old and tired.  The secular press, and even some in the Catholic sphere, discuss this to the point of detracting from the Mass of the Lord's Supper.  The ceremony involving foot-washing isn't even required and was absent for some period until it was brought back in 1955.  Since there is so much controversy surrounding it, I was not planning to discuss it and I don't care to comment on the prudential decisions of the Holy Father or my Archbishop.   It's not my place.

However, an article appearing in yesterday's Detroit Free Press by Patricia Montemurri was just brought to my attention and since it mentions Assumption Grotto there are things I would like to address.

The article is a perfect example of how foot washing has come to dominate Holy Thursday in the eyes of many inside and outside of the Church.  Perhaps some good would come from suspending the practice again for a time so we can all take stock of the fact that the Eucharist was instituted on Holy Thursday!  I doubt that will happen.

Let's look at that part of the article dealing with Detroit (my intra-text comments bracketed in red).  I'm snipping some text out to save space so read it all there.

At metro Detroit parishes, women have been included in the foot-washing ritual for decades. Detroit Catholic Archbishop Allen Vigneron poured water onto the feet of five women and seven men at the Holy Thursday mass at Blessed Sacrament Cathedral. [This is a prudential decision, following a 1987 USCCB document which varies from what is in the Sacramentary, so no comment]
In 1987, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops urged [???] that women be included in the ritual, and it’s been standard practice in many parishes, although it’s left to the discretion of individual bishops and parish pastors, said Dan McAfee, the Detroit archdiocese’s Christian worship director. 

Since the text of the second paragraph above is not in quotes I do not know what is coming from the reporter and what is coming from Dan McAfee. It may be paraphrased and embellished.  The document does NOT "urge" anything; rather, it tells priests and bishops they MAY deviate from what is in the Sacramentary.  Let's look at the two relevant paragraphs from the 1987 USCCB letter and you will find nothing "urging" anything. Feel free to read the entire letter. Here are paragraphs 4 & 5.

4. Because the gospel of the mandatum read on Holy Thursday also depicts Jesus as the "Teacher and Lord" who humbly serves his disciples by performing this extraordinary gesture which goes beyond the laws of hospitality, the element of humble service has accentuated the celebration of the foot washing rite in the United States over the last decade or more. In this regard, it has become customary in many places to invite both men and women to be participants  in this rite in recognition of the service that should be given by all the faithful to the Church and to the world. Thus, in the United States, a variation in the rite developed in which not only charity is signified but also humble service. [An unfortunate method of getting Church laws changed is to first break a  law until a practice becomes popular, then make it the law.] 

5. While this variation may [?!?!?] differ from the rubric of the Sacramentary which mentions only men ("viri selecti"), it may nevertheless be said that the intention [this is "spirit of" language which was used to introduce many innovations] to emphasize service along with charity in the celebration of the rite is an understandable way of accentuating the evangelical command of the Lord, "who came to serve and not to be served," that all members of the Church must serve one another in love.

Continuing with the Detroit Free Press article, quoting Fr. Perrone:
Some Catholic pastors adhere to a traditional interpretation. [No. It is not "traditional interpretation" to follow Church law]. 
“We’ll have 12 men dressed as apostles and they have their feet washed in the ceremony,” said the Rev. Eduard Perrone, pastor of Assumption Grotto Catholic Church in northeast Detroit. “That’s the tradition in the church and we’ve not deviated from that.”

Looking at how Fr. Perrone was quoted, the first question that popped into my head when I read this was: Did Father get baited asked if he was washing the feet of women this year, without being told it was a story about the Archbishop of Detroit washing women's feet?  I have not talked with Fr. Perrone yet so I do not know, but a young adult altar server who told me of the article wondered likewise.

I find it interesting that Patricia Montemurri decided to zero in on Assumption Grotto, as if she didn't already know the answer to the question. This was just a way to take a jab at people minding their own business on a controversial issue, in one of very few parishes using the 1962 Missal, and attempting to apply public pressure to drive change.

Those who advocate for tolerance do so as long as you don't take notice of their intolerance of those who choose to do what is within their right.     It's unfortunate that other Catholics, especially in the comment box at the Free Press article, would choose to be critical of a practice at Assumption Grotto that is in harmony with Church law and is not criticized by the Archbishop of Detroit or his Christian worship director.  The Pope himself has not criticized those who do not wash the feet of women and in one year's time, he has not made it a point to change the law!  If he wanted to "urge" every priest to include the feet of women in the ceremony, he could have done it with the stroke of a pen!

I keep saying law because it is not a simple rubric; it involves canon law.  The Free Press author quoted blogging canonist Ed Peters (my emphasis in bold).

Edward Peters, a church canon law expert at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, wrote on his blog, canonlawblog.wordpress.com, in 2013 that Francis was setting a “questionable example” by washing women’s feet, because a 1988 letter from the Vatican’s Congregation for Divine Worship states that only “chosen men” can be admitted to the ceremony. [I cannot find the specific blog post citing the 1988 letter, but Ed has written extensively on this controversy and you can sift through them all in this search of his blog]
Peters, in an email this week, said he doesn’t oppose women being in the ceremony, he feels that church law should make it clear that it’s acceptable. [Whether one agrees or not on women being in the ceremony, there is the whole problem with violating existing laws without changing them, which causes nothing but confusion, controversy, and quarrels]
“Outdated Church laws should be removed but the system for doing that is not being observed in this area. [Exactly, though I don't agree that this one is outdated].  The current situation, therefore — that of having a law on the books, but one not observed locally or in Rome — breeds confusion about what law is for in the Church,” Peters wrote. [Bingo. So there are at least two problems: One is the question of women in the ceremony, when Christ could have washed the feet of women that night; and secondly, the question of consequences to breaking Church law to observe a particular practice, rather than working to first change the law, if there are grounds for changing them (mindful that the Holy Father has power to bind and loose, and it causes fewer problems when done formally.)]
Odell Roberts, 69, of Allen Park participated in the past as one of the 12 parishioners in the ritual at Blessed Sacrament Cathedral. Cardinal Adam Maida, the archdiocese’s leader from 1990 to 2009, washed her feet. 
“It was very special,” she said.

I'm a woman who pretty much grew up watching women's feet get washed at local parishes on Holy Thursday when I did go, along with many other liturgical innovations.  Truth be told, I don't recall seeing it any other way until I got to Assumption Grotto in 2005.  As a female, I can probe the depths of spiritual lessons during the foot-washing of all males because my active participation in the Mass and liturgical ceremonies is deeply interior and not dependent on "doing" something. In fact, the less I do the more I can participate (contrary to popular belief, I'd rather not be photographing, but do so because it is a service to others who do not have access to this beautiful form of the liturgy).  Inclusiveness doesn't come from being up in the sanctuary; it's a response to God's grace to give my entire being in worship and prayer while observing and reflecting right along with all the other men in the pews not having their feet washed.

Once again, it is so regrettable that we have seen few discussions about the institution of the Eucharist on Holy Thursday.  What a lost opportunity to catechize the faithful on the Eucharist at a time in history when we know people lack a deep understanding.  I know so many Catholics who are just fine with their children and grand-children leaving the Church for other Christian churches and groups, as long as they go to some Church.  Yet, there's no concern for them not having access to the Eucharist and other Sacraments where they go.  People who haven't set foot in a confessional in years go up to Communion in droves. These things are telling our pastors something and we talk about foot-washing?

Something is messed up and it's fruit is confusion, conflict, and quarreling - all amidst an ongoing mass ignorance of the Eucharist.

Photo at top taken at Assumption Grotto on April 17, 2014 at the Mass of the Lord's Supper, during the foot washing ceremony.  Fr. Eduard Perrone, the pastor of Assumption Grotto, using the 1962 Missal, washes the foot of a man. He is joined by the deacon of this Solemn High Mass, Fr. Aidan Logan, o.c.s.o. (hooded); and the subdeacon, Fr. John Bustamante, who is the associate pastor of Assumption Grotto. 


For interesting news items I don't have time to blog on, check out my Twitter Feed: @TeDeumBlog

Te Deum Laudamus! Home

The obedient are not held captive by Holy Mother Church;
it is the disobedient who are held captive by the world!

- Diane M. Korzeniewski

Note: The recommended links below are automatically generated by the tool, so they are not necessarily related content.

Friday, April 18, 2014

Holy Thursday 2014 in Photos at Assumption Grotto

Here are pics from last night's Solemn High Mass, Eucharistic Procession, Stripping of Altar, and Compline. I have more but made an error that will cause any links to my smugmug page on it to be broke when I fix it later.   These may be used online with a link back to this post.

I'll also be posting some information on how pictures can be ordered, once I get the link corrected.  I may have to delete the gallery to fix it, so I do not recommend ordering from Smugmug yet. Parents of altar boys especially want pictures, and I've made it possible for individuals to order without my involvement.  More on that later.



These flower petals will be used later.



Master of Ceremonies, Dale, processes ahead of the ministers.  From the back is Fr. Perrone, the celebrant. Fr. Aidan Logan, a Cistercian monk wearing the hood is the deacon of the Mass, and Fr. John Bustamante is the subdeacon.







Fr. Logan was the homilist.  I wish I had recorded it, but I had forgotten my iPhone.





Fr. Perrone washed the feet of 12 men of the parish.




Next to the elevation, seen above, this below is one of the most beautiful scenes in the usus antiquior.  The deacon and subdeacon are showing reverence for the sacredness of the moment when the celebrant consumes the Body of Christ and the Precious Blood.  This visible sign of reverence should draw us into deeper prayer, if we are not yet there.


The Eucharistic procession begins.




Children distribute rose petals all along the path Our Lord takes to the Altar of Repose.



During the Gloria we heard the bells and trumpet. But the bells gave way to the crotalus - a wooden "clapper."  Two are seen here, with one in motion.  See a discussion of it at Sancta Missa.  Flower petals are readily visible floor.






Altar boys are in place, kneeling at the Altar of Repose, waiting for Fr. Perrone and the Eucharist.










After the priests and altar boys exited, the remaining Consecrated Hosts were removed from the Tabernacle by Fr. Logan.  Once again, the Ombrellino is used to cover the Eucharist, along with the Humeral Veil which is draped around the shoulders of the priest and over the Blessed Sacrament.  This covering of the Eucharist has Old Testament roots. Think of how the Ark of the Covenant was veiled and covered.  Some of these things are no longer practiced in parishes, which is a pity because it provides an opportunity to show and discuss these connections.


Any time a priest accesses the Tabernacle, it is a good, pious practice to stop and drop (kneel if possible or at least bow if unable to kneel).  It is a sign of reverence for Our Eucharistic Lord who is being exposed.  I learned this watching the altar boys at Grotto when I first got there.

Below we see the Stripping of the Altar by the deacon of the Mass and subdeacon.  The altar boys carry away what the priests give them, and other things like flowers.   We see Fr. Perrone standing in the center, and with assistance, chants from Psalm 21 (see the full prayer and discussion here, towards the end).  The antiphon is striking.  As the ministers remove the altar covering, the antiphon is chanted: They parted my garments amongst them, and upon my vesture they cast lots (Ps 21:19). Think about that.


Here is something from the Catholic Encyclopedia on Stripping of Altars:

The Christian altarrepresents Christ, and the stripping of the altar reminds us how He was stripped of his garments when He fell into the hands of the Jews and was exposed naked to their insults. It is for this reason that the psalm "Deus, Deus meus" is recited, wherein the Messias speaks of the Roman soldiers dividing His garments among them. This ceremony signifies the suspension of the Holy Sacrifice. It was formerly the custom in some churches on this day to wash the altars with a bunch of hyssop dipped in wine and water, to render them in some manner worthy of the Lamb without stain who is immolated on them, and to recall to the minds of the faithful with how great purity they should assist at the Holy Sacrifice and receive Holy Communion.St. Isidore of Seville (De Eccles. Off, I, xxviii) and St. Eligius of Noyon (Homil. VIII, De Coena Domini) say that this ceremony was intended as an homageoffered to Our Lord, in return for the humility wherewith He deigned to wash the feet of His disciples.



After the Altars were stripped, the clerics and some of the altar boys chanted Compline using the older breviary.







People then gathered at the Altar of Repose until Midnight.


Around 10:00 p.m. a group of Missionaries of Charity (Mother Teresa's order) came in to sit with Our Lord.  They travel quite a distance from the other side of Detroit.  One is seen here in the foreground.




For interesting news items I don't have time to blog on, check out my Twitter Feed: @TeDeumBlog

Te Deum Laudamus! Home

The obedient are not held captive by Holy Mother Church;
it is the disobedient who are held captive by the world!

- Diane M. Korzeniewski

Note: The recommended links below are automatically generated by the tool, so they are not necessarily related content.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Holy Week Schedule at Assumption Grotto



The schedule, as posted earlier, is below.  We are blessed to have Father Aidan Logan, o.c.s.o. with us for Holy Week and he will be involved in the Sacred Triduum which uses the 1962 Missal at Assumption Grotto.  Father Logan was recently named the Vocations Director for the Archdiocese for Military Services, USA.  He was introduced on page 24 in the current issue of Salute, the archdiocesan magazine.  With almsgiving a big part of our Lenten sacrifices, I'll use this as an opportunity to encourage you to click that donate button in the upper right hand corner of the website as there are many needs for the spiritual care of our men and women of the military.

Something worth noting on Thursday is that if you stay for a bit after the Mass, you will witness the altar formally being stripped.  The Liturgy of the Hours is chanted by the priests and some of the altar boys after that, in Latin.  The Church goes silent and people come and go through Midnight spending time before the Altar of Repose shown in the photo at top.  It follows a procession (see my Holy Thursday pics from 2009 here).


Holy Week Schedule

Holy Thursday, April 17th (No morning Masses)

7:00 p.m. Tridentine Mass of the Lord’s Supper followed by Procession with Blessed Sacrament & Adoration in the church until Midnight

Good Friday, April 18th  (No morning Masses)

12:00 noon until 
3:00 p.m. •Tridentine Tre Ore (three hour) Services
•Solemn Liturgy with sung Passion according to Saint John; Veneration of the Cross; Holy Communion
3:00 p.m. Divine Mercy Prayers,  
7:00 p.m. Stations of the Cross

Holy Saturday, April 19th  (No morning Masses and no 4:00 p.m. Mass)

1:00 p.m. Blessing of Easter foods and baskets,  
8:00 p.m. Tridentine Easter Vigil Mass

Easter Sunday, April 20th, Masses

6:30 a.m. English low Mass,  
9:30 a.m. Tridentine Latin Orchestral Mass by Robert Schumann 
12:00 noon English sung Mass

CONFESSIONS (5 opportunities)

Thursday, April 17: 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Friday, April 18: 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m
Saturday, April 19: 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Note: There will not be confessions Saturday evening April 19 nor on Easter Sunday morning.


Easter Mass Cards are available at the rectory for the Easter Triduum Masses Divine Mercy Sunday, April 27, May 4, & May 11.



For interesting news items I don't have time to blog on, check out my Twitter Feed: @TeDeumBlog

Te Deum Laudamus! Home

The obedient are not held captive by Holy Mother Church;
it is the disobedient who are held captive by the world!

- Diane M. Korzeniewski

Note: The recommended links below are automatically generated by the tool, so they are not necessarily related content.

Archdiocese of Dublin issues statement on Maria Divine Mercy



One of the more strange alleged private revelations currently popular with some people is Maria Divine Mercy (MDM).  Numerous other bishops had issued statements warning people to steer clear of this alleged private revelation, but when it came to the attention of the Archdiocese of Dublin, the statement below was issued.  


Here is the statement from the Archdiocese of Dublin, where this woman presumably resides.

STATEMENT OF ARCHDIOCESE OF DUBLIN

ON THE ALLEGED VISIONARY “MARIA DIVINE MERCY” 
Requests for clarification have been coming to the Archdiocese of Dublin concerning the authenticity of alleged visions and messages received by a person who calls herself “Maria Divine Mercy” and who may live in the Archdiocese of Dublin.  
Archbishop Diarmuid Martin wishes to state that these messages and alleged visions have no ecclesiastical approval and many of the texts are in contradiction with Catholic theology.  
These messages should not be promoted or made use of within Catholic Church associations.

Maria Divine Mercy had gotten some Catholics more than a little uptight and suspicious of Pope Francis, if not outright rejecting him.  When a so-called mystic gets you to reject the Supreme Pontiff, or causes you to have very negative feelings about him, it's time to hit a confessional for a sense check.

There is a blog called, Maria Divine Mercy - True or False?  If you are looking for perspective on why bishops are reacting, find it all there.  Here is a list of heresies.

The photo at top was taken from another site that has some extensive details about the kind of financial activities "Maria Divine Mercy" has been engaging in.  This is not the stuff of virtue.

I've also gotten questions in recent weeks about Three Days of Darkness prophesies, as well.  Some cite text from Padre Pio that is questionable and suspect; others reference Maria Divine Mercy.  Stay away from this stuff.

Pray your Rosary, do First Saturday Devotions, spend time in the Adoration chapel praying for conversion of others and for the release of souls from purgatory, read spiritual classics like those from Teresa of AvilaFrancis de Sales, and this one covering the major works by and about St. Francis.  We also have so many writings of the popes, and the Fathers and Doctors of the Church. Why spend time reading so-called prophesies of those who have not been vetted by the Church when we have such a time-tested treasury to mine?




For interesting news items I don't have time to blog on, check out my Twitter Feed: @TeDeumBlog

Te Deum Laudamus! Home

The obedient are not held captive by Holy Mother Church;
it is the disobedient who are held captive by the world!

- Diane M. Korzeniewski

Note: The recommended links below are automatically generated by the tool, so they are not necessarily related content.

Monday, April 7, 2014

Holy Week Schedule for Assumption Grotto



Here is Grotto's Holy Week schedule.  But first, I regret not posting more frequently. However, the good news is that I've returned to work after finding some medicine that is helping with the abdominal problem I have been having.  Please pray for my continued recovery.

One way to follow my posts during a period which is sure to be a little more light than usual is to subscribe to my posts by email (see the sidebar just under the news section). Things like Facebook and Google+ almost require you to be in those applications not long after I post something, unless there are a lot of comments or likes/1+ to push it back to the top of people's news feeds.  I use Feedly myself and add URL's I want to track.  See a review of RSS readers here.

I want to get to Grotto's Holy Week Schedule.

Holy Week Schedule

Holy Thursday, April 17th (No morning Masses)

7:00 p.m. Tridentine Mass of the Lord’s Supper followed by Procession with Blessed Sacrament & Adoration in the church until Midnight

Good Friday, April 18th  (No morning Masses)

12:00 noon until 
3:00 p.m. •Tridentine Tre Ore (three hour) Services
•Solemn Liturgy with sung Passion according to Saint John; Veneration of the Cross; Holy Communion
3:00 p.m. Divine Mercy Prayers,  
7:00 p.m. Stations of the Cross

Holy Saturday, April 19th  (No morning Masses and no 4:00 p.m. Mass)

1:00 p.m. Blessing of Easter foods and baskets,  
8:00 p.m. Tridentine Easter Vigil Mass

Easter Sunday, April 20th, Masses

6:30 a.m. English low Mass,  
9:30 a.m. Tridentine Latin Orchestral Mass by Robert Schumann
12:00 noon English sung Mass

CONFESSIONS (5 opportunities)
Thursday, April 17: 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Friday, April 18: 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m
Saturday, April 19: 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m; 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Note: There will not be confessions Saturday evening April 19 nor on Easter Sunday morning.

Noteworthy: St, Cyril's  CONFESSION DAY: Monday, April 14: 10:00AM—NOON & 6:00PM—9:00PM


Easter Mass Cards are available at the rectory for the Easter Triduum Masses Divine Mercy Sunday, April 27, May 4, & May 11.




For interesting news items I don't have time to blog on, check out my Twitter Feed: @TeDeumBlog

Te Deum Laudamus! Home

The obedient are not held captive by Holy Mother Church;
it is the disobedient who are held captive by the world!

- Diane M. Korzeniewski

Note: The recommended links below are automatically generated by the tool, so they are not necessarily related content.

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Pope Francis on the evangelizing power of popular piety



I started reading the Apostolic Exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium by Pope Francis a little late and have been in a slow read.  There is a section on popular piety I read last night that was quite moving.  I'd like to share what the Holy Father said.  Here, I am copying in full text as I don't have time for paraphrasing  (I've eliminated the footnotes, so see the original text for source of quotes.)


The evangelizing power of popular piety 
122. In the same way, we can see that the different peoples among whom the Gospel has been inculturated are active collective subjects or agents of evangelization. This is because each people is the creator of their own culture and the protagonist of their own history. Culture is a dynamic reality which a people constantly recreates; each generation passes on a whole series of ways of approaching different existential situations to the next generation, which must in turn reformulate it as it confronts its own challenges. Being human means “being at the same time son and father of the culture to which one belongs”. Once the Gospel has been inculturated in a people, in their process of transmitting their culture they also transmit the faith in ever new forms; hence the importance of understanding evangelization as inculturation. Each portion of the people of God, by translating the gift of God into its own life and in accordance with its own genius, bears witness to the faith it has received and enriches it with new and eloquent expressions. One can say that “a people continuously evangelizes itself”. Herein lies the importance of popular piety, a true expression of the spontaneous missionary activity of the people of God. This is an ongoing and developing process, of which the Holy Spirit is the principal agent.

123. Popular piety enables us to see how the faith, once received, becomes embodied in a culture and is constantly passed on. Once looked down upon, popular piety came to be appreciated once more in the decades following the Council. In the Exhortation Evangelii Nuntiandi, Pope Paul VI gave a decisive impulse in this area. There he stated that popular piety “manifests a thirst for God which only the poor and the simple can know” and that “it makes people capable of generosity and sacrifice even to the point of heroism, when it is a question of bearing witness to belief”. Closer to our own time, Benedict XVI, speaking about Latin America, pointed out that popular piety is “a precious treasure of the Catholic Church”, in which “we see the soul of the Latin American peoples”.

In some quarters of the Church it is still looked down upon so I am glad that Pope Francis devoted a section to it in Evangelii Gaudium.  

When Paul VI talked about the poor and the simple, keep in mind that poor and simple does not mean unintelligent.  Our Lord wanted us to approach the faith as children and popular piety allows even the smallest of children to participate in some way.  Also, when we think especially of those who are materially poor, we see people who are heavily burdened with labor, perhaps with only enough time to make use of pious devotions.  Many people find solace in praying a Rosary when burdened, from every spectrum. It can be prayed while walking or commuting to school or work.  Within a given culture, you can see the impoverished along with the wealthy venerating the Blessed Virgin Mary, the  Eucharist, and various saints - often in huge events.  Some are specific to a particular country as we see in the Philippines, in Latin American and European countries, and in parts of Africa, among others.  Much of that has been brought to countries like the United States and Canada where others have been evangelized by it.

124. The Aparecida Document describes the riches which the Holy Spirit pours forth in popular piety by his gratuitous initiative. On that beloved continent, where many Christians express their faith through popular piety, the bishops also refer to it as “popular spirituality” or “the people’s mysticism”. It is truly “a spirituality incarnated in the culture of the lowly”. Nor is it devoid of content; rather it discovers and expresses that content more by way of symbols than by discursive reasoning, and in the act of faith greater accent is placed on credere in Deum than on credere DeumIt is “a legitimate way of living the faith, a way of feeling part of the Church and a manner of being missionaries”; it brings with itself the grace of being a missionary, of coming out of oneself and setting out on pilgrimage: “Journeying together to shrines and taking part in other manifestations of popular piety, also by taking one’s children or inviting others, is in itself an evangelizing gesture”. Let us not stifle or presume to control this missionary power!  

125. To understand this reality we need to approach it with the gaze of the Good Shepherd, who seeks not to judge but to love. Only from the affective connaturality born of love can we appreciate the theological life present in the piety of Christian peoples, especially among their poor. I think of the steadfast faith of those mothers tending their sick children who, though perhaps barely familiar with the articles of the creed, cling to a rosary; or of all the hope poured into a candle lighted in a humble home with a prayer for help from Mary, or in the gaze of ten- der love directed to Christ crucified. No one who loves God’s holy people will view these actions as the expression of a purely human search for the divine. They are the manifestation of a theological life nourished by the working of the Holy Spirit who has been poured into our hearts (cf. Rom 5:5). 

Excellent point about busy mothers, which goes to my point further up about the burdened.   Likewise, I have seen many cling to a Rosary when a loved one is dying, even though they don't pray it daily.  Some might scoff at this, but graces come from even small gestures like this.  It expresses faith because one without faith would look for solace in some other way.

126. Underlying popular piety, as a fruit of the inculturated Gospel, is an active evangelizing power which we must not underestimate: to do so would be to fail to recognize the work of the Holy Spirit. Instead, we are called to promote and strengthen it, in order to deepen the never-ending process of inculturation. Expressions of popular piety have much to teach us; for those who are capable of reading them, they are a locus theologicus which demands our attention, especially at a time when we are looking to the new evangelization. 

Amen.

I recommend reading Evanglii Gaudium yourself.  I've seen parts of it distorted often by cherry-picking a line or partial paragraph.  People have been wrongly attributing things to the Holy Father that he did not say in this exhortation.  By relying on blogs and websites to tell you what is in it, you risk spreading untruths which opens the door to calumny.  Don't worry about the big words Pope Francis sometimes uses - just use a dictionary the way past generations did.  If you still don't understand something, move on and don't get bogged down in it.


Related:

The Holy See created a document containing directives for popular piety in order to curb some abuses, but also to make known it's value and legitimacy.  I you have not read it, I recommend this.  It was written in December of 2001 by the Congregation for Divine Worship.
  



For interesting news items I don't have time to blog on, check out my Twitter Feed: @TeDeumBlog

Te Deum Laudamus! Home

The obedient are not held captive by Holy Mother Church;
it is the disobedient who are held captive by the world!

- Diane M. Korzeniewski

Note: The recommended links below are automatically generated by the tool, so they are not necessarily related content.

Pope sneaks off to Confession ahead of hearing them


Photo: Osservatore/ANSA


As part of a push by Pope Francis to keep churches in dioceses around the world open for Confession this weekend, and to create greater awareness, he surprised his own Master of Ceremonies, Msgr. Guido Marini, when he made  bee-line for a confessional himself before starting.

Here's the video…




From Vatican Radio:

Pope Francis delivered the homily at a penitential service over which he was presiding in St. Peter’s Basilica on Friday afternoon. The order of the celebration included Psalms, readings from Sacred Scripture, and hymns, all focused on the theme of repentance and God’s boundless mercy.  

The service was a part of the “24 Hours for the Lord” initiative, being celebrated throughout the Rome diocese and in many local Churches throughout the world, in which the faithful receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation and then become special ambassadors of Christ’s mercy, inviting people to avail themselves of the Lord’s forgiveness in churches that are to remain open through the night.

And, the same Vatican Radio link gives text for what the Holy Father had to say:

In the period of Lent, the Church, in the name of God, renews the call to conversion. It is the call to change one’s life. Conversion is not a matter of a moment or a year, is a commitment that lasts a lifetime. Who among us can be assumed not to be a sinner? No one. The Apostle John writes: “If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous so as to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness (1 John 1:8-9).” This is what happens in our celebration and throughout this day of penance. The Word of God we have heard introduces us to two essential elements of the Christian life. 

The first [is]: put on the new man. The new man, “created according to God(Eph 4:24),” is born in Baptism, where one receives the very life of God, which makes us His sons and incorporates us into Christ and his Church. This new life allows one to look at reality with different eyes, without being distracted by things that do not matter and cannot last long.
 
For this we are called to abandon sinful behaviour and fix our gaze on that, which is essential. “Man is more precious for what he is than for what he has. (Gaudium et Spes, 35)” Behold the difference between the life deformed by sin and the life illumined by grace. From the heart of the man renewed according to God come good behaviors: always to speak with truth and avoid any lie; to steal not, but rather to share what you have with others; especially with those in need; not to give in to anger, resentment and revenge, but to be gentle, magnanimous and ready to forgive; not to fall into backbiting that ruins people’s good name, but to look more rather on each person’s positive side. 

The second factor [is]: Remain in my love. The love of Jesus Christ lasts forever, will never end because it is the very life of God. This love conquers sin and gives strength to get up and start anew, because with pardon the heart is renewed and rejuvenated. Our Father never tires of loving and His eyes did not grow heavy in looking at the way home, to see if his Son who left and was lost will return. And this Father does not tire of loving even His other son, who, though he remains ever in the house with Him, nevertheless does not take part in His mercy, His compassion. God is not only the source of love, but in Jesus Christ calls us to imitate his own way of loving: “As I have loved you, so you also should love one another. (Jn 13:34)” To the extent that Christians live this love, they become credible disciples of Christ in the world. Love cannot stand to remain locked up in itself. By its very nature [Love] is open, it spreads and is fruitful, [it] always generates new love.
 

Dear brothers and sisters, after this celebration, many of you will make yourselves missionaries to the experience of reconciliation with God. “24 hours for the Lord” is an initiative in which many dioceses all over the world are participating. To everyone you meet, you will communicate the joy of receiving the Father’s forgiveness and regaining full friendship with Him. The one who experiences the mercy of God, is driven to be the creator of mercy among the poor and the least. In these “littlest brothers and sisters” Jesus waits for us (cf. Mt 25:40). Let us go to meet them! And we will celebrate Easter in the joy of God!

 

Yesterday, looking at Father Z's post on this, it was unfortunate that the first commenter took a pharisaical, rigorist viewpoint by complaining about the Pope going to Confession face-to-face (this stuff really gives the traditionalist movement a black-eye in general).  Fortunately, rather than delete it, Father Z let it stand, but not without the virtual equivalent of slapping him upside the head.  The only thing left to do with people afflicted with raising such things to the level of doctrines is to give them hemorrhoid creme so they can loosen up.

On that subject, a Facebook friend posted this collection of photos and art showing a number of instances where Confession is heard without secrecy including the one with St. John Bosco, and some with St. Padre Pio, among others.  Some of these images might actually be blessings, not Confessions, but most are and you get the idea.  You also don't get to carry a grate with you on the battlefield or in a hospital bed.





Here is Saint Leopold Mandic - known as the apostle of the confessional.  He died in 1942.




I found this piece of art and wondered about it's origin, but it obviously is not depicting a recent era.   I love the image.



If anyone knows the artist and name of the painting, please email me TeDeumBlog (at) gmail (dot) com, or in social media.  I have shut down comments for this blog indefinitely because I don't want to manage them and cannot leave them unmoderated due to spammers.

Hooray! One of my Facebook followers found information on the painting directly above.  Here is the explanation from All-Posters:

The Seven Sacraments Altarpiece, detail of the baptism, the confirmation and the confession, from the left wing, c.1445 (oil on panel) (see also 168159 & 168161-64), Weyden, Rogier van der (1399-1464) / Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerp, Belg

Here is what is meant by "left wing" (we have only a cropped version above of the original painting). I love this style of art.




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The obedient are not held captive by Holy Mother Church;
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